Objective: In this article, we propose the clinical construct of Video-terminal Dissociative Trance (VDT) and discuss its potential usefulness for the assessment and treatment of people who display problematic Internet use. VDT is defined as a clinical syndrome characterized by clusters of symptoms in the psychological domains of addiction, regression, and dissociation in the individual’s interactions with the computer and its applications. Method: Study 1 examines the relationships between Internet addiction symptoms, dissociative experiences, and attachment styles in a sample of university students. Study 2 explores the associations between Internet addiction symptoms, cyberpornography use, and dissociative experiences in another sample of university students. Two clinical vignettes are presented to provide anecdotal evidence for VDT cases. Results: Preoccupied attachment style and dissociation predicted Internet addiction symptoms in Study 1. Dissociation scores predicted Internet addiction symptoms in Study 2, while cyberpornography use did not add to the prediction. Clinical vignettes suggest that a VDT framework can help to interpret both of these findings and improve the understanding of the specific motives behind an individual’s misuse of the Internet. Conclusions: VDT may involve significant disturbances in the state of consciousness, identity, and memory, the dilution of self-awareness and self-integrity, and the replacement of the customary sense of personal identity by a new virtual identity. People who display problematic Internet use may greatly benefit from clinical interventions aimed at addressing these symptoms and understanding their origins.Objective: In this article, we propose the clinical construct of Video-terminal Dissociative Trance (VDT) and discuss its potential usefulness for the assessment and treatment of people who display problematic Internet use. VDT is defined as a clinical syndrome characterized by clusters of symptoms in the psychological domains of addiction, regression, and dissociation in the individual’s interactions with the computer and its applications. Method: Study 1 examines the relationships between Internet addiction symptoms, dissociative experiences, and attachment styles in a sample of university students. Study 2 explores the associations between Internet addiction symptoms, cyberpornography use, and dissociative experiences in another sample of university students. Two clinical vignettes are presented to provide anecdotal evidence for VDT cases. Results: Preoccupied attachment style and dissociation predicted Internet addiction symptoms in Study 1. Dissociation scores predicted Internet addiction symptoms in Study 2, while cyberpornography use did not add to the prediction. Clinical vignettes suggest that a VDT framework can help to interpret both of these findings and improve the understanding of the specific motives behind an individual’s misuse of the Internet. Conclusions: VDT may involve significant disturbances in the state of consciousness, identity, and memory, the dilution of self-awareness and self-integrity, and the replacement of the customary sense of personal identity by a new virtual identity. People who display problematic Internet use may greatly benefit from clinical interventions aimed at addressing these symptoms and understanding their origins.

Video-terminal dissociative trance: Toward a psychodynamic understanding of problematic internet use

SCHIMMENTI, ADRIANO;
2017

Abstract

Objective: In this article, we propose the clinical construct of Video-terminal Dissociative Trance (VDT) and discuss its potential usefulness for the assessment and treatment of people who display problematic Internet use. VDT is defined as a clinical syndrome characterized by clusters of symptoms in the psychological domains of addiction, regression, and dissociation in the individual’s interactions with the computer and its applications. Method: Study 1 examines the relationships between Internet addiction symptoms, dissociative experiences, and attachment styles in a sample of university students. Study 2 explores the associations between Internet addiction symptoms, cyberpornography use, and dissociative experiences in another sample of university students. Two clinical vignettes are presented to provide anecdotal evidence for VDT cases. Results: Preoccupied attachment style and dissociation predicted Internet addiction symptoms in Study 1. Dissociation scores predicted Internet addiction symptoms in Study 2, while cyberpornography use did not add to the prediction. Clinical vignettes suggest that a VDT framework can help to interpret both of these findings and improve the understanding of the specific motives behind an individual’s misuse of the Internet. Conclusions: VDT may involve significant disturbances in the state of consciousness, identity, and memory, the dilution of self-awareness and self-integrity, and the replacement of the customary sense of personal identity by a new virtual identity. People who display problematic Internet use may greatly benefit from clinical interventions aimed at addressing these symptoms and understanding their origins.Objective: In this article, we propose the clinical construct of Video-terminal Dissociative Trance (VDT) and discuss its potential usefulness for the assessment and treatment of people who display problematic Internet use. VDT is defined as a clinical syndrome characterized by clusters of symptoms in the psychological domains of addiction, regression, and dissociation in the individual’s interactions with the computer and its applications. Method: Study 1 examines the relationships between Internet addiction symptoms, dissociative experiences, and attachment styles in a sample of university students. Study 2 explores the associations between Internet addiction symptoms, cyberpornography use, and dissociative experiences in another sample of university students. Two clinical vignettes are presented to provide anecdotal evidence for VDT cases. Results: Preoccupied attachment style and dissociation predicted Internet addiction symptoms in Study 1. Dissociation scores predicted Internet addiction symptoms in Study 2, while cyberpornography use did not add to the prediction. Clinical vignettes suggest that a VDT framework can help to interpret both of these findings and improve the understanding of the specific motives behind an individual’s misuse of the Internet. Conclusions: VDT may involve significant disturbances in the state of consciousness, identity, and memory, the dilution of self-awareness and self-integrity, and the replacement of the customary sense of personal identity by a new virtual identity. People who display problematic Internet use may greatly benefit from clinical interventions aimed at addressing these symptoms and understanding their origins.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11387/123114
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