Aristotle defines nemesis (to nemesan ¼ from the verb nemesao) as the emotional reaction of someone with a noble character at unmerited good fortune. That another’s good fortune is a central element of nemesis can also be inferred by the contraposition Aristotle proposed between nemesis and pity, which is pain at undeserved bad fortune. The modern concept of indignation, commonly used as a translation for the word nemesis, refers to outrage at a general form of injustice, and usually a serious one. The authors intend to remain faithful to the original meaning of the term and to explore the impact it can have with respect to law

What does Nemesis have to do with the legal system? Discussing Aristotle’s neglected emotion and its relevance for law and politics

CORSO LUCIA
2018

Abstract

Aristotle defines nemesis (to nemesan ¼ from the verb nemesao) as the emotional reaction of someone with a noble character at unmerited good fortune. That another’s good fortune is a central element of nemesis can also be inferred by the contraposition Aristotle proposed between nemesis and pity, which is pain at undeserved bad fortune. The modern concept of indignation, commonly used as a translation for the word nemesis, refers to outrage at a general form of injustice, and usually a serious one. The authors intend to remain faithful to the original meaning of the term and to explore the impact it can have with respect to law
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11387/128318
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