Abstract: In wireless telephony and audio data mining applications, it is desirable that noise suppression can be made robust against changing noise conditions and operate in real time (or faster). The learning effectiveness and speed of artificial neural networks are therefore critical factors in applications for speech enhancement tasks. To address these issues, we present an extreme learning machine (ELM) framework, aimed at the effective and fast removal of background noise from a single-channel speech signal, based on a set of randomly chosen hidden units and analytically determined output weights. Because feature learning with shallow ELM may not be effective for natural signals, such as speech, even with a large number of hidden nodes, hierarchical ELM (H-ELM) architectures are deployed by leveraging sparse auto-encoders. In this manner, we not only keep all the advantages of deep models in approximating complicated functions and maintaining strong regression capabilities, but we also overcome the cumbersome and time-consuming features of both greedy layer-wise pre-training and back-propagation (BP) based fine tuning schemes, which are typically adopted for training deep neural architectures. The proposed ELM framework was evaluated on the Aurora–4 speech databases. The Aurora4 task provides relatively limited training data, and test speech data corrupted with both additive noise and convolutive distortions for matched and mismatched channels and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. In addition, the task includes a subset of testing data involving noise types and SNR levels that are not seen in the training data. The experimental results indicate that when the amount of training data is limited, both ELM and H-ELM based speech enhancement techniques consistently outperform the conventional BP-based shallow and deep learning algorithms, in terms of standardized objective evaluations, under various testing conditions.

Experimental Study on Extreme Learning Machine Applications for Speech Enhancement

S. M. SINISCALCHI
Investigation
;
2017

Abstract

Abstract: In wireless telephony and audio data mining applications, it is desirable that noise suppression can be made robust against changing noise conditions and operate in real time (or faster). The learning effectiveness and speed of artificial neural networks are therefore critical factors in applications for speech enhancement tasks. To address these issues, we present an extreme learning machine (ELM) framework, aimed at the effective and fast removal of background noise from a single-channel speech signal, based on a set of randomly chosen hidden units and analytically determined output weights. Because feature learning with shallow ELM may not be effective for natural signals, such as speech, even with a large number of hidden nodes, hierarchical ELM (H-ELM) architectures are deployed by leveraging sparse auto-encoders. In this manner, we not only keep all the advantages of deep models in approximating complicated functions and maintaining strong regression capabilities, but we also overcome the cumbersome and time-consuming features of both greedy layer-wise pre-training and back-propagation (BP) based fine tuning schemes, which are typically adopted for training deep neural architectures. The proposed ELM framework was evaluated on the Aurora–4 speech databases. The Aurora4 task provides relatively limited training data, and test speech data corrupted with both additive noise and convolutive distortions for matched and mismatched channels and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. In addition, the task includes a subset of testing data involving noise types and SNR levels that are not seen in the training data. The experimental results indicate that when the amount of training data is limited, both ELM and H-ELM based speech enhancement techniques consistently outperform the conventional BP-based shallow and deep learning algorithms, in terms of standardized objective evaluations, under various testing conditions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11387/126161
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