Co-firing of biomass and coal may increase short-term renewable fuel usage. However, the lower heating value and higher reactivity of raw biomass can result in fuel segregation in boilers, causing burnout at lower temperatures, lower steam generation efficiency and fouling. These issues may be addressed by hydrothermally carbonizing moist biomasses to produce hydrochars that more closely resemble coal’s properties prior to co-firing. In the present work, we probe the co-oxidation behavior of a series of hydro- thermally carbonized biomass samples over a range of hydrochar-coal blend ratios to determine the degree of carbonization necessary to reduce fuel segregation. However, due to the presence of an extractable amorphous secondary char, even highly carbonized hydrochars have considerably higher oxidative reactivity than a re- presentative bituminous coal sample. When blended, the hydrochars and coal display distinct derivative thermogravimetric oxidation ranges, in which a low-temperature peak is dominated by the secondary char oxidation. As a co-fired fuel, it appears that blending hydrochars up to 10 wt% with a bituminous coal is possible as a partial fuel substitution. To increase the percentage of hydrochars blended with coal, it may be necessary to extract this secondary char (which contains valuable biofuels and platform chemicals) before blending.

Does hydrothermal carbonization as a biomass pretreatment reduce fuel segregation of coal-biomass blends during oxidation?

Volpe, Maurizio
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2019

Abstract

Co-firing of biomass and coal may increase short-term renewable fuel usage. However, the lower heating value and higher reactivity of raw biomass can result in fuel segregation in boilers, causing burnout at lower temperatures, lower steam generation efficiency and fouling. These issues may be addressed by hydrothermally carbonizing moist biomasses to produce hydrochars that more closely resemble coal’s properties prior to co-firing. In the present work, we probe the co-oxidation behavior of a series of hydro- thermally carbonized biomass samples over a range of hydrochar-coal blend ratios to determine the degree of carbonization necessary to reduce fuel segregation. However, due to the presence of an extractable amorphous secondary char, even highly carbonized hydrochars have considerably higher oxidative reactivity than a re- presentative bituminous coal sample. When blended, the hydrochars and coal display distinct derivative thermogravimetric oxidation ranges, in which a low-temperature peak is dominated by the secondary char oxidation. As a co-fired fuel, it appears that blending hydrochars up to 10 wt% with a bituminous coal is possible as a partial fuel substitution. To increase the percentage of hydrochars blended with coal, it may be necessary to extract this secondary char (which contains valuable biofuels and platform chemicals) before blending.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11387/137280
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