In this study, a hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediment was treated applying ex-situ thermal desorption (ESTD) at bench-scale. Temperatures up to 280 °C and heating times (t) in the 5–30 min range were investigated. Results revealed that temperatures in the range 200–280 °C led to Total Petrol Hydrocarbon (TPH)-removal efficiency (RE) from 75 to 85% (t = 10 min). The maximum RE of 89% was obtained at 200 °C for 30 min. However, a shorter remediation time of 5 min (or lower temperatures of 160 and 180 °C with longer times) is needed to reach the TPH standard limit. Data also demonstrated the selectivity of the treatment in TPH fraction removal. The modelling of the TPH removal kinetics and desorption isotherm jointly with activation energy calculation (>30 kJ mol−1) indicated that ESTD process is quite unfavorable for marine sediments. This is due to the fact that ESTD is regulated by chemisorption processes and occurred in two distinct TPH removal phases: evaporation and boiling vaporization. This depends on the strong affinity of the TPH with the fine sediment particles, as well as on the high initial water, salinity, organic matter and sulfides content. However, the comparison between alternative processes has shown that ESTD is the most feasible treatment process for TPH-contaminated marine sediment remediation. Obtained results also add relevant information that can be used as a basis for future scaling-up investigations of ESTD for hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments.

Remediation of petrol hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments by thermal desorption

Lumia, Lucia;Giustra, Maria Gabriella;Di Bella, Gaetano
2020

Abstract

In this study, a hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediment was treated applying ex-situ thermal desorption (ESTD) at bench-scale. Temperatures up to 280 °C and heating times (t) in the 5–30 min range were investigated. Results revealed that temperatures in the range 200–280 °C led to Total Petrol Hydrocarbon (TPH)-removal efficiency (RE) from 75 to 85% (t = 10 min). The maximum RE of 89% was obtained at 200 °C for 30 min. However, a shorter remediation time of 5 min (or lower temperatures of 160 and 180 °C with longer times) is needed to reach the TPH standard limit. Data also demonstrated the selectivity of the treatment in TPH fraction removal. The modelling of the TPH removal kinetics and desorption isotherm jointly with activation energy calculation (>30 kJ mol−1) indicated that ESTD process is quite unfavorable for marine sediments. This is due to the fact that ESTD is regulated by chemisorption processes and occurred in two distinct TPH removal phases: evaporation and boiling vaporization. This depends on the strong affinity of the TPH with the fine sediment particles, as well as on the high initial water, salinity, organic matter and sulfides content. However, the comparison between alternative processes has shown that ESTD is the most feasible treatment process for TPH-contaminated marine sediment remediation. Obtained results also add relevant information that can be used as a basis for future scaling-up investigations of ESTD for hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11387/142395
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 8
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact