BackgroundThere is a paucity of outcome data on patients who are morbidly obese (MO) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement. We aimed to determine their periprocedural and midterm outcomes and investigate the impact of obesity phenotype.Methods and ResultsConsecutive patients who are MO (body mass index, >= 40 kg/m(2), or >= 35 kg/m(2) with obesity-related comorbidities; n=910) with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement in 18 tertiary hospitals were compared with a nonobese cohort (body mass index, 18.5-29.9 kg/m(2), n=2264). Propensity-score matching resulted in 770 pairs. Pre-transcatheter aortic valve replacement computed tomography scans were centrally analyzed to assess adipose tissue distribution; epicardial, abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat. Major vascular complications were more common (6.6% versus 4.3%; P=0.043) and device success was less frequent (84.4% versus 88.1%; P=0.038) in the MO group. Freedom from all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were similar at 2 years (79.4 versus 80.6%, P=0.731; and 88.7 versus 87.4%, P=0.699; MO and nonobese, respectively). Multivariable analysis identified baseline glomerular filtration rate and nontransfemoral access as independent predictors of 2-year mortality in the MO group. An adverse MO phenotype with an abdominal visceral adipose tissue:subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio >= 1 (VAT:SAT) was associated with increased 2-year all-cause (hazard ratio [HR], 3.06; 95% CI, 1.20-7.77; P=0.019) and cardiovascular (hazard ratio, 4.11; 95% CI, 1.06-15.90; P=0.041) mortality, and readmissions (HR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.07-3.07; P=0.027). After multivariable analysis, a (VAT:SAT) ratio >= 1 remained a strong predictor of 2-year mortality (hazard ratio, 2.78; P=0.035).ConclusionsTranscatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who are MO has similar short- and midterm outcomes to nonobese patients, despite higher major vascular complications and lower device success. An abdominal VAT:SAT ratio >= 1 identifies an obesity phenotype at higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes.

Impact of Morbid Obesity and Obesity Phenotype on Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

Barbanti, Marco;
2021-01-01

Abstract

BackgroundThere is a paucity of outcome data on patients who are morbidly obese (MO) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement. We aimed to determine their periprocedural and midterm outcomes and investigate the impact of obesity phenotype.Methods and ResultsConsecutive patients who are MO (body mass index, >= 40 kg/m(2), or >= 35 kg/m(2) with obesity-related comorbidities; n=910) with severe aortic stenosis who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement in 18 tertiary hospitals were compared with a nonobese cohort (body mass index, 18.5-29.9 kg/m(2), n=2264). Propensity-score matching resulted in 770 pairs. Pre-transcatheter aortic valve replacement computed tomography scans were centrally analyzed to assess adipose tissue distribution; epicardial, abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat. Major vascular complications were more common (6.6% versus 4.3%; P=0.043) and device success was less frequent (84.4% versus 88.1%; P=0.038) in the MO group. Freedom from all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were similar at 2 years (79.4 versus 80.6%, P=0.731; and 88.7 versus 87.4%, P=0.699; MO and nonobese, respectively). Multivariable analysis identified baseline glomerular filtration rate and nontransfemoral access as independent predictors of 2-year mortality in the MO group. An adverse MO phenotype with an abdominal visceral adipose tissue:subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio >= 1 (VAT:SAT) was associated with increased 2-year all-cause (hazard ratio [HR], 3.06; 95% CI, 1.20-7.77; P=0.019) and cardiovascular (hazard ratio, 4.11; 95% CI, 1.06-15.90; P=0.041) mortality, and readmissions (HR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.07-3.07; P=0.027). After multivariable analysis, a (VAT:SAT) ratio >= 1 remained a strong predictor of 2-year mortality (hazard ratio, 2.78; P=0.035).ConclusionsTranscatheter aortic valve replacement in patients who are MO has similar short- and midterm outcomes to nonobese patients, despite higher major vascular complications and lower device success. An abdominal VAT:SAT ratio >= 1 identifies an obesity phenotype at higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11387/157587
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