Healthcare -associated infections (HAIs) are one of the most relevant public health problems worldwide. The role of the hospital environment as a reservoir of pathogens causing HAIs is still debated. These pathogens are common in several hospital environments, where they are able to persist from hours to months and their circulation is favored by healthcare workers (HCWs). Hospital surfaces at close contact with patients such as bed bars and header, bedside table, taps, and handles in wards (“high-touched surfaces”), are considered easily contaminable and at risk to transfer pathogens to patients. However, some studies showed the possible role played by “non-classical” surfaces such as healthcare workers’ (HCWs) mobile phones and personal computers as well as oxygen humidifiers and protective lead garments used in operating rooms. HCWs’ hands play a fundamental role in patient-to-patient transmission by touching contaminated surfaces or patients during care activities. The aim of this review is to evaluate the role of the hospital environment in the transmission of nosocomial pathogens, focusing on single pathogens causing HAIs and the importance of hospital surfaces as reservoirs.

The role of the hospital environment in the healthcare-associated infections: A general review of the literature

Ceccarelli M.;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Healthcare -associated infections (HAIs) are one of the most relevant public health problems worldwide. The role of the hospital environment as a reservoir of pathogens causing HAIs is still debated. These pathogens are common in several hospital environments, where they are able to persist from hours to months and their circulation is favored by healthcare workers (HCWs). Hospital surfaces at close contact with patients such as bed bars and header, bedside table, taps, and handles in wards (“high-touched surfaces”), are considered easily contaminable and at risk to transfer pathogens to patients. However, some studies showed the possible role played by “non-classical” surfaces such as healthcare workers’ (HCWs) mobile phones and personal computers as well as oxygen humidifiers and protective lead garments used in operating rooms. HCWs’ hands play a fundamental role in patient-to-patient transmission by touching contaminated surfaces or patients during care activities. The aim of this review is to evaluate the role of the hospital environment in the transmission of nosocomial pathogens, focusing on single pathogens causing HAIs and the importance of hospital surfaces as reservoirs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11387/159459
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