Aims: Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is a major challenge for healthcare systems. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease, is a risk factor for primary and recurrent CDI (rCDI). Moreover, CDI itself often worsens the clinical picture of IBD, increasing the risk of complications. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective treatment for rCDI, but data from patients with IBD and CDI are limited and often referred to mixed cohorts. We aimed to report outcomes from a cohort of patients with UC treated with FMT for rCDI superinfection. Methods and results: In a retrospective, single-centre cohort study we evaluated characteristics and outcomes of patients with UC who received FMT for rCDI. The primary outcome was negative C. difficile toxin 8 weeks after FMT. Thirty-five patients were included in the analysis. Sixteen patients were cured after single FMT, while 19 patients received repeat FMT. Overall, FMT cured rCDI in 32 patients (91%), and repeat FMT was significantly associated with sustained cure of CDI compared with single FMT (84% vs 50%, p = 0.018). Twenty-four patients (69%) experienced remission or an amelioration of UC activity. Serious adverse events were not observed.Conclusions: In our cohort of patients with UC, FMT was highly effective in curing rCDI without severe adverse events and repeat FMT was significantly associated with CDI cure. Most patients also experienced remission or amelioration of UC activity after FMT. Our findings suggest that a sequential FMT protocol may be used routinely in patients with UC and rCDI.

Fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection in patients with concurrent ulcerative colitis

Maida, Marcello
Formal Analysis
;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Aims: Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is a major challenge for healthcare systems. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease, is a risk factor for primary and recurrent CDI (rCDI). Moreover, CDI itself often worsens the clinical picture of IBD, increasing the risk of complications. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective treatment for rCDI, but data from patients with IBD and CDI are limited and often referred to mixed cohorts. We aimed to report outcomes from a cohort of patients with UC treated with FMT for rCDI superinfection. Methods and results: In a retrospective, single-centre cohort study we evaluated characteristics and outcomes of patients with UC who received FMT for rCDI. The primary outcome was negative C. difficile toxin 8 weeks after FMT. Thirty-five patients were included in the analysis. Sixteen patients were cured after single FMT, while 19 patients received repeat FMT. Overall, FMT cured rCDI in 32 patients (91%), and repeat FMT was significantly associated with sustained cure of CDI compared with single FMT (84% vs 50%, p = 0.018). Twenty-four patients (69%) experienced remission or an amelioration of UC activity. Serious adverse events were not observed.Conclusions: In our cohort of patients with UC, FMT was highly effective in curing rCDI without severe adverse events and repeat FMT was significantly associated with CDI cure. Most patients also experienced remission or amelioration of UC activity after FMT. Our findings suggest that a sequential FMT protocol may be used routinely in patients with UC and rCDI.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11387/164704
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