The increased survival of cancer patients has raised growing public health concern on associated long-term consequences of antineoplastic treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a primarily sensory polyneuropathy, which may be accompanied by pain, autonomic disturbances, and motor deficit. About 70% of treated cancer patients might develop CIPN during or after the completion of chemotherapy, and in most of them such complication persists after six months from the treatment. The definition of the potential risk of development and resolution of CIPN according to a clinical and biochemical profile would be certainly fundamental to tailor chemotherapy regimen and dosage on individual susceptibility. In recent years, patient-reported and clinician-related tools along with quality of life instruments have been featured as primary outcomes in clinical setting and randomized trials. New studies on metabolomics markers are further pursuing accurate and easily accessible indicators of peripheral nerve damage. The aim of this review is to outline the strengths and pitfalls of current knowledge on CIPN, and to provide a framework for future potential developments of standardized protocols involving clinical and biochemical markers for CIPN assessment and monitoring.

Clinical and biochemical markers in CIPN: A reappraisal

Bonomo, R;
2021-01-01

Abstract

The increased survival of cancer patients has raised growing public health concern on associated long-term consequences of antineoplastic treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a primarily sensory polyneuropathy, which may be accompanied by pain, autonomic disturbances, and motor deficit. About 70% of treated cancer patients might develop CIPN during or after the completion of chemotherapy, and in most of them such complication persists after six months from the treatment. The definition of the potential risk of development and resolution of CIPN according to a clinical and biochemical profile would be certainly fundamental to tailor chemotherapy regimen and dosage on individual susceptibility. In recent years, patient-reported and clinician-related tools along with quality of life instruments have been featured as primary outcomes in clinical setting and randomized trials. New studies on metabolomics markers are further pursuing accurate and easily accessible indicators of peripheral nerve damage. The aim of this review is to outline the strengths and pitfalls of current knowledge on CIPN, and to provide a framework for future potential developments of standardized protocols involving clinical and biochemical markers for CIPN assessment and monitoring.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11387/166258
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