Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of voice therapy combined with standard anti-reflux therapy in reducing symptoms and signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). Methods: A randomised clinical trial was conducted. Fifty-two patients with LPR diagnosed by 24 h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring were randomly allocated in two groups: medical treatment (MT) and medical plus voice therapy (VT). Clinical symptoms and laryngeal signs were assessed at baseline and after 3 months of treatment with the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI), Reflux Finding Score (RFS), Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and GRBAS scales. Results: Groups had similar scores at baseline. At 3-month follow-up, a significant decrease in RSI and RFS total scores were found in both groups although it appeared to be more robust in the VT group. G and R scores of the GRBAS scale significantly improved after treatment in both groups, with better results in the VT group. The VHI total score at 3 months improved more in the VT group (VHI delta 9.54) than in the MT group (VHI delta 5.38) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of voice therapy to medications and diet appears to be more effective in improving treatment outcomes in subjects with LPR. Voice therapy warrants consideration in addition to medication and diet when treating patients with LPR.

Is there a role for voice therapy in the treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux? A pilot study

Maniaci, Antonino;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of voice therapy combined with standard anti-reflux therapy in reducing symptoms and signs of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). Methods: A randomised clinical trial was conducted. Fifty-two patients with LPR diagnosed by 24 h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring were randomly allocated in two groups: medical treatment (MT) and medical plus voice therapy (VT). Clinical symptoms and laryngeal signs were assessed at baseline and after 3 months of treatment with the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI), Reflux Finding Score (RFS), Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and GRBAS scales. Results: Groups had similar scores at baseline. At 3-month follow-up, a significant decrease in RSI and RFS total scores were found in both groups although it appeared to be more robust in the VT group. G and R scores of the GRBAS scale significantly improved after treatment in both groups, with better results in the VT group. The VHI total score at 3 months improved more in the VT group (VHI delta 9.54) than in the MT group (VHI delta 5.38) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of voice therapy to medications and diet appears to be more effective in improving treatment outcomes in subjects with LPR. Voice therapy warrants consideration in addition to medication and diet when treating patients with LPR.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11387/166529
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