Background: To investigate perception, adoption, and awareness on the part of otolaryngology and head and neck surgeons (OTO-HNS) of transoral robotic surgery (TORS). Methods: Several items assessed: awareness/perception; access to TORS; training; indications and advantages/hurdles to TORS practice. A subanalysis was performed to assess differences according to the identified otolaryngological subspecialties. Results: A total of 359 people completed the survey. Among subspecialties, while for otolaryngologists 30/359 (8.4%) and H&N surgeons 100/359 (27.9%) TORS plays an effective role in hospital stay, laryngologists frequently disagreed (54.3%). There was a lower incidence among rhinologists and otologists (1.9%). Pediatric surgeons (0.8%) reported a positive response regarding the adoption of robotic surgery, and head and neck specialists expressed an even greater response (14.2%). Low adherence was related to perceived cost-prohibitive TORS, by 50% of H&N surgeons. Conclusions: Perception, adoption, and knowledge about TORS play a key role in the application of the robotic system, significantly varying across subspecialties.

Influence of Otolaryngological Subspecialties on Perception of Transoral Robotic Surgery: An International YO-IFOS Survey

Maniaci, Antonino;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: To investigate perception, adoption, and awareness on the part of otolaryngology and head and neck surgeons (OTO-HNS) of transoral robotic surgery (TORS). Methods: Several items assessed: awareness/perception; access to TORS; training; indications and advantages/hurdles to TORS practice. A subanalysis was performed to assess differences according to the identified otolaryngological subspecialties. Results: A total of 359 people completed the survey. Among subspecialties, while for otolaryngologists 30/359 (8.4%) and H&N surgeons 100/359 (27.9%) TORS plays an effective role in hospital stay, laryngologists frequently disagreed (54.3%). There was a lower incidence among rhinologists and otologists (1.9%). Pediatric surgeons (0.8%) reported a positive response regarding the adoption of robotic surgery, and head and neck specialists expressed an even greater response (14.2%). Low adherence was related to perceived cost-prohibitive TORS, by 50% of H&N surgeons. Conclusions: Perception, adoption, and knowledge about TORS play a key role in the application of the robotic system, significantly varying across subspecialties.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11387/166548
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