Objective: Pediatric inferior turbinate hypertrophy (PedTH) is a frequent and often overlooked cause or associated cause of nasal breathing difficulties. This clinical consensus statement (CCS) aims to provide a diagnosis and management framework covering the lack of specific guidelines for this condition and addressing the existing controversies. Methods: A clinical consensus statement (CCS) was developed by a panel of 20 contributors from 7 different European and North American countries using the modified Delphi method. The aim of the CCS was to offer a multidisciplinary reference framework for the management of PedTH on the basis of shared clinical experience and analysis of the strongest evidence currently available. Results: A systematic literature review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria was performed. From the initial 96 items identified, 7 articles were selected based on higher-evidence items such as randomized-controlled trials, guidelines, and systematic reviews. A 34-statement survey was developed, and after three rounds of voting, 2 items reached strong consensus, 17 reached consensus or near consensus, and 15 had no consensus. Conclusions: Until further prospective data are available, our CCS should provide a useful reference for PedTH management. PedTH should be considered a nasal obstructive disease not necessarily related to an adult condition but frequently associated with other nasal or craniofacial disorders. Diagnosis requires clinical examination and endoscopy, whereas rhinomanometry, nasal cytology, and questionnaires have little clinical role. Treatment choice should consider the specific indications and features of the available options, with a preference for less invasive procedures. Level of evidence: 5 Laryngoscope, 134:1437-1444, 2024.

Pediatric Inferior Turbinate Hypertrophy: Diagnosis and Management. A YO-IFOS Consensus Statement

Maniaci, Antonino;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Objective: Pediatric inferior turbinate hypertrophy (PedTH) is a frequent and often overlooked cause or associated cause of nasal breathing difficulties. This clinical consensus statement (CCS) aims to provide a diagnosis and management framework covering the lack of specific guidelines for this condition and addressing the existing controversies. Methods: A clinical consensus statement (CCS) was developed by a panel of 20 contributors from 7 different European and North American countries using the modified Delphi method. The aim of the CCS was to offer a multidisciplinary reference framework for the management of PedTH on the basis of shared clinical experience and analysis of the strongest evidence currently available. Results: A systematic literature review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria was performed. From the initial 96 items identified, 7 articles were selected based on higher-evidence items such as randomized-controlled trials, guidelines, and systematic reviews. A 34-statement survey was developed, and after three rounds of voting, 2 items reached strong consensus, 17 reached consensus or near consensus, and 15 had no consensus. Conclusions: Until further prospective data are available, our CCS should provide a useful reference for PedTH management. PedTH should be considered a nasal obstructive disease not necessarily related to an adult condition but frequently associated with other nasal or craniofacial disorders. Diagnosis requires clinical examination and endoscopy, whereas rhinomanometry, nasal cytology, and questionnaires have little clinical role. Treatment choice should consider the specific indications and features of the available options, with a preference for less invasive procedures. Level of evidence: 5 Laryngoscope, 134:1437-1444, 2024.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11387/169769
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